An introduction to the geography of constantinople the gateaway city

Constantinople Jan 05, Constantinople:

An introduction to the geography of constantinople the gateaway city

Located at the mouth of the Bosporus straights and controlling access between the Mediterranean and Black Seas, Constantinople was strategically located to control the lucrative trade routes to the east.

In general, we can divide the cities development to three distinct phases. These included central avenue Mese running east-west through the city, along with numerous forums lined with colonnades, bath complexes, an aqueduct, granaries, and a vast hippodrome to entertain the population.

Throughout the 5th century, the number of churches and monasteries greatly multiplied within the cities walls, and gradually altered the social and cultural make-up of its urban space. They were the primary centers of distribution of charity and often functioned as hospitals, hostels, and old-age homes.

Though easily defended from the sea, Byzantium was vulnerable to attack from land. The fortifications consisted of three layers. Advancing towards the city, an enemy army was first faced with a large moat. Taken together with facilities that must have existed to distribute and process the imported food stuff, and one begins to get a sense of the vast logistical problems faced by the late-Roman state in Constantinople.

As befitted an imperial capital, Constantinople contained numerous monumental public buildings. By far the largest, and most impressive, church in Constantinople was the Hagia Sophia, the church of the Wisdom Sophia of Christ.

It combined the longitudinal layout of the basilica with a domed interior space of a centrally planned structure. Begun possibly in the late 2ndcentury AD, and only completed in the 4th during the reign of Constantine I, the Hippodrome was the site of chariot races as well as public ceremonies, such as Imperial triumphs.

An introduction to the geography of constantinople the gateaway city

There is considerable controversy over whether or not Constantinople was a regularly planned city. To date, only one discernible processional avenue has been identified, the Mese, and even this street has only been excavated meters or so.

For example, the church of Hagia Sophia runs perpendicular to the main road, while the church of St.

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Eirene, turned slightly to the south, does not align to the main avenue and would seem to be located in an irregular city block. It therefore became necessary to use extensive terracing throughout the city in order to create some degree of level foundation for both public and private buildings.

The geography of Constantinople, with its hilly terrain, meant that a systematic grid plan was impractical. The lack of defensible frontiers along its landward axis also dictated the creation of a series of impressive fortification systems.

Massive ports, dockyards, and warehouses were required all along the cities coastline in order to accommodate the volume of ships necessary to supply the capital adequately with imported food. Above all, the development of Constantinople from the 4th to 6th centuries AD can be seen as indicative of many of the transformations that were sweeping through the Mediterranean world and that marked the end of antiquity and the beginning of the medieval period.

A History of Byzantium. Blackwell History of the Ancient World. Warfare, State, and Society in the Byzantine World: University College London Press, The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Justinian. Cambridge University Press, The Walls of Constantinople, AD Topic Geography of Constantinople study guide by Mr_Hotaling includes 11 questions covering vocabulary, terms and more.

Quizlet flashcards, activities and games help you improve your grades. The Development of Constantinople, AD The city of Constantinople, capital of the late Roman and Byzantine Empire’s, was one of the last great ancient cities.

Located at the mouth of the Bosporus straights and controlling access between the Mediterranean and Black Seas, Constantinople was strategically located to control the lucrative trade .

An introduction to the geography of constantinople the gateaway city

The architecture of the Byzantine Empire was based on the great legacy of Roman formal and technical achievements. Constantinople had been purposely founded as the Christian counterpart and successor to the leadership of the old pagan city of Rome.

The Development of Constantinople, AD | History Cooperative

Constantinople is the main setting of the game "Assassin's Creed: Revelations," the fourth major title in the best-selling "Assassin's Creed" series. Constantinople is also a setting of the Vampire: The Dark Ages role playing game by White Wolf. Constantinople is one of the territories featured in the Board Game Diplomacy.

It is one of the default territories of Turkey. In Constantinople it was very much of a city type environment.

It was the center of many trade routes and that is why it was the capital of the. The city of Constantinople, capital of the late Roman and Byzantine Empire’s, was one of the last great ancient cities. Located at the mouth of the Bosporus straights and controlling access between the Mediterranean and Black Seas, Constantinople was strategically located to control the lucrative trade routes to the east.

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