A literary analysis of the main character winston smith in 1984 by george orwell

For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one: Book 1, Chapter 3 Quotes To know and not to know, to be conscious of complete truthfulness while telling carefully constructed lies, to hold simultaneously two opinions which cancelled out, knowing them to be contradictory and believing in both of them, to use logic against logic, to repudiate morality while laying claim to it, to believe that democracy was impossible and that the Party was the guardian of democracy, to forget, whatever it was necessary to forget, then to draw it back into memory again at the moment when it was needed, and then promptly to forget it again, and above all, to apply the same process to the process itself—that was the ultimate subtlety:

A literary analysis of the main character winston smith in 1984 by george orwell

September 9, 12 Comments George Orwell developed the theme of under a shroud of dystopian totalitarianism, when the novel is really a metaphorical satire of modern class structure.

A literary analysis of the main character winston smith in 1984 by george orwell

When the book is taken at face-value, readers and critics conclude that the theme of is a warning against communist totalitarianism and the looming threat of dystopian totalitarianism in the future. Winston Smith, his chin nuzzled into his breast in an effort to escape the vile wind, slipped quickly through the glass doors of Victory Mansions, though not quickly enough to prevent a swirl of gritty dust from entering along with him.

The individualist spirit that overcomes Winston is one thing that the totalitarian state of Oceania fears most and in order to suppress that spirit, it must be wiped out.

SparkNotes: Winston Smith

Resemblances, also, to the years of Stalinist terror in Russia. The salient idea of is modern class warfare, and Orwell gives frightening glimpses of the Inner Party the upper-class using the totalitarian government for control over the Outer Party middle-class and proletariat working-class.

There are many different tools that the Inner-Party uses besides Big Brother to keep the lower classes under control. Newspeak, telescreens, thought police, Ministry of Love, double think, war, prostitution, alcohol, gambling, the lottery and propaganda are only some of the many tools used by the Inner party in order to keep control.

The propaganda of is an interesting aspect of the plethora of tools the Inner Party uses to maintain power. Newspeak is the new language that is developed by the inner-party to suppress any unorthodox thought.

Linguistics is an important factor of the Inner Party controlling the Outer Party and the proletariat. This concept of complete totalitarianism is another exaggeration used by Orwell in order to convince the reader of the control of the upper-class in modern society.

This controlling of thought and words through speech is one of many examples of a state of controlled insanity. Newspeak is the easiest way that the Inner Party can communicate their insane views upon the lower classes as they literally would not be able to question any Party rules Ranald Par.

This can distantly relate to what Orwell saw as modern linguistics slang, vernacular and lack of education being used to keep the lower classes in their positions in the class structure in order for the upper-class to retain power. The theme of is a warning of totalitarianism, but the power of the state Big Brother is only a veil that covers the true power of the upper-class in the so-called democracies of the western world.

When Winston is tortured and re-educated in the Ministry of Love, Orwell deconstructs the human being and throws away all hope that may have been left in the novel. Orwell exaggerates all of the metaphors in his novel to coincide with the world of that he was living in.

Orwell was a socialist himself, and he was exhibiting the powers of the upper-class that kept the elite in their positions throughout human history. Filed under Non Fiction Tagged with authoritarianbig brotherbooksclass struggledystopiafictionGovernmentliteratureoceaniaorwellpowerSocialismstalintotalitarianismwritingww2 About Sean William Lynch Sean Lynch is a writer and editor who lives in South Philly.Analysis of Winston Smith In the novel by George Orwell, Winston Smith is the protagonist.

He is thirty-nine years old, frail, and thin. He is thirty-nine years old, frail, and thin. Winston is a common man that most of the readers can sympathize with.

Winston Smith

The character O'Brien plays an important role in George Orwell's novel In this lesson, find out who O'Brien is and explore some of his most important quotes from the novel. Winston Smith Orwell’s primary goal in is to demonstrate the terrifying possibilities of totalitarianism.

The reader experiences the nightmarish world that Orwell envisions through the eyes of . In George Orwell's , Winston Smith is an open source developer who writes his code offline because his ISP has installed packet sniffers that are regulated by the government under the Patriot Act.

George Orwell Character Analyses Section: Chapter: Character Analyses Because of the satirical purpose which Orwell had in writing , the characters in the book tend to be shadowy or two-dimensional stereotypes.

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Thus, only one character in the entire work is presented as a complete and believable human being; that is, of course, . Analysis of Winston Smith In the novel by George Orwell, Winston Smith is the protagonist. He is thirty-nine years old, frail, and thin.

Winston is a common man that most of the readers can sympathize with.

Winston Smith Character Analysis in | LitCharts